Monday, July 10, 2006

Forgotten



Unaware. Trapped as they walked. We look, turn them over in our minds, our hands. The reach, the touch. Forever frozen. Long after they have forgotten.

We yearn to be trapped.

How much have we forgotten?

(Picture: Leaf River IR Trail Camera, Starlight, Wayne County, Pennsylvania)

29 comments:

LiVEwiRe said...

Absolutely fantastic image... and words that really give me something to think about.

Sandra Ruttan said...

Wow Jason. Fantastic picture, and what a sentiment. It's the one thing photos do for us, well, and I suppose the grave markers you reference so often as well.

Beautiful and powerful.

Kelly Parra said...

Beautiful, Jason. The words and image fit together wonderfully.

Bernita said...

The camera will steal/reveal our souls...perhaps?

JLB said...

I was thinking about this when watching a History Channel special the other day about animals and their constructions... beavers, spiders, birds... creatures who know how to build strong, perfectly-suited structures by instinct...

It certainly begs the question How much have we forgotten?

Flood said...

Stunning picture.

Sometimes I think we forget how to be, always needing to do.

Scott said...

Good question. How much have we forgotten?

Robert Ball said...

We are all trapped on the rim of this blue-green ball and better start remembering it and act accordingly. Another nice, thought provoking picture Jason!

beadinggalinMS said...

Amazing photo!!
You forget so much during your hetic lifestyle that once in awhile you like to be trapped so you can just sit back and reflect. That is how your words spoke to me this morning. Cause I have been reflecting on will my kiddos remember the fun we had yesterday? It was just a simple day of playing in the pool and a friendly competive game of Monoply or will they remember what they watched on tv? I hope they remember the fun we had. :)

Jeff said...

Nice photo, Jason.
Film has an amazing way of capturing moments in time and keeping memories fresh. :)

jason evans said...

Livewire, thanks! :) It was a real treat to see that image when we checked the camera.

Sandra, much appreciated! I love letting photographs inspire me. Crafting words might take effort, but feeling the sentiment underlying them never does.

Kelly, thanks, my friend. :)

Bernita, it sees things we don't. Moments which should be treasured, and in being captured, are treasured.

JLB, that's a fascinating angle! Yes, the notion of born-in knowledge is perplexing. How can knowledge be coded in DNA?

Flood, a noble thought. Writers should especially stop to appreciate being. We need to gather life for our stories.

Scott, that's the trouble with forgetting. You can't remember what you've forgotten.

Robert, I agree. It's important to appreciate the true nature of our existence. Very fragile. Always being erased.

Beady, If nothing else, you perceived that a fond memory was being created. That's a treasure, isn't it? When you know you're experiencing something you'll remember forever.

Jeff, those captured moments never die so long as the picture endures.

Scott said...

What were we talking about?

anna said...

There is nothing quite so charming
as a mother and child - any kind of child I think. and the poem is
a mind turner that's for sure.
Does a camera steal a bit of our soul?
Excellent!!

Melissa Marsh said...

What a wonderful picture. I love to watch deer - they're so graceful and lovely.

Writing Blind said...

Oh, this is lovely, the image, the words. Just lovely.

Shesawriter said...

Haunting prose, haunting pic. Great job, Jason.

Tanya

anne frasier said...

breathtaking, jason.



verification:
xwuapush

Anthony J. Rapino said...

Thoughtful piece. Vivid and haunting.

mermaid said...

You know what I love about this? For a moment there, I couldn't figure out if we humans or the deer were talking.

The black and white also adds to the sentiment of memory, and all the details we forget because we are too busy to appreciate the moment for what it is.

jason evans said...

Scott, exactly.

Anna, never is the march of time more apparent than with the growth of a child. Wonderful and poignant at the same time.

Melissa, thanks! Not all of these automated pictures work out so well. ;)

Writing Blindly, thank you kindly. :)

Tanya, I'm almost glad you can barely see the fawn's face. It seems more fragile that way.

Anne, thanks, my friend. And yes, I could use a push.

Anthony, I'm haunted by what we fail to capture and record.

Mermaid, too busy to appreciate the moment for what it is.... Yes, that is the sentiment it evoked for me. Complete chance made these deer walk this path on this day. Did this moment mean as much to them as it does to us? We are the actors in these moments every day.

Erik Ivan James said...

Over my many years of wandering the woods of Michigan, I've been blessed to see scenes like this for real. The picture here is awsome. To see such in one's presence is beyond awesome. Thanks, Jason.

shirley buxton said...

Gentle, gracious, powerful.

Blessings,

Shirley Buxton
www.writenow.wordpress.com

Dana Y. T. Lin said...

Oooo, nice pic.

Kara Alison said...

Jason - I really love this. The idea, the photo, the words.

And to answer your question: I don't think we can ever know. It's both the gift and the curse of time.

Jay said...

I once read a book about how humans used to have a common memory with their ancestors - they could remember when fire was first discovered, when their own mother was born, etc, etc. I have been obsessed with trying to tap into that ever since.

The Clown said...

.... And how much do we remember our forgetting? Smile.bzm

jason evans said...

Erik, very true, my friend. I've yet to see a doe and young fawn in the flesh, but that same weekend, my daughter and I saw a mother and baby porcupine up close. Very cool.

Shirley, thank you! Those three adjectives are high praise. :)

Dana, thanks! I admit it's one the better ones we've captured.

Kara, that's an intriguing notion. Time is a gift and a curse. We can lessen the curse, though. Even the act of blogging fights it. It preserves us. Holds our thoughts and perceptions. We can't win the war, but we can win a few battles.

Jay, humans do have programmed actions and reflexes. Actual memory, though, would be something far greater and complex. Unfortunately, DNA is not that changeable from generation to generation.

The Clown, I'm actually not too bad at that one. ;) At least I think so....

Eileen said...

I worship this photo. You need to start a gallery- you would make a fortune.

jason evans said...

Eileen, :D Thank you. This one is a special one. Especially given the total randomness involved. The picture was taken by an unattended camera.