Monday, September 21, 2009

Incidence



in all the far lands
torn by continental seas
two embrace a meadow

16 comments:

Karen said...

Beautiful thought to begin this workweek. At first I read an "in" in the last line, but on second read, I see that the poem is totally different without it - "embrace a meadow" has the whole of creation in it. William Blake said, "To see the world in a grain of sand" - this reflects the same feeling.

Margaret said...

Your poem and photo give a feeling of contentment! :)

Catvibe said...

Lovely tiny delicateness.

PhilipH said...

Simply perfect.

PixieDust said...

How did you manage to capture the vastness of distance and the intimacy of an embrace in three simple and perfect lines?

:-)

love,
me

Mona said...

Distances may seem to separate, but links are inevitably there

Haikus are such meaningful poetry! :)

Meghan said...

Lovely.

K.Lawson Gilbert said...

as many embrace your words....just lovely, Jason

jason evans said...

Karen, you really captured it with that observation. :) Place and time...we minimize them, but actually, they profoundly govern us. To overcome them is something profound.

Margaret, something has triumphed here.

Catvibe, the forest flowers seem so emphemeral.

PhilipH, thanks!

PixieDust, I like trying to tap into the raw power of words. I was thinking about drilling down on haiku. How few words could one use? I suppose, the ultimate would be three words, one for each line. But I digress. Thank you for sensing that same power.

Mona, so very true. I wonder what they mean.

Meghan, thank you!

Kaye, what a wonderful thing to say! If that's true in even small ways, then I've accomplished something I'll treasure always.

Shadow said...

less is more... perfect jason!

the walking man said...

Classic form wonderfully done.

jason evans said...

Shadow, somehow it intensifies.

Walking Man, thanks! Haiku really is a surprisingly rich tool.

Laurel said...

I've been fascinated by haiku since I was nine. The structural, math-y element of it appeals to me, like sonnets. It's like DNA: hyperstructure with infinite possibility for expression.

If I have the luxury of driving alone, I turn off the radio and compose haikus in my head.

Haiku is the chinoiserie of poetry and this one is lovely. Elemental, understated, elegant. Nice work.

Kurt Hendricks said...

Haiku is hard; much harder than it looks.

Well done.

jason evans said...

Laurel, I like the force of brevity too. The message must be dripping with potency to work.

Kurt, you need to slice off just the right amount of subject matter.

Vesper said...

Beautiful, Jason. I could loose myself in both photo and words...